Africa / Crop-Livestock / East Africa / HUMIDTROPICS / IITA / Intensification / Research / Southern Africa / Tanzania

Mycotoxin contamination in Tanzania: Quantifying the problem in maize and cassava in households and markets

In 2012, Africa RISING funded an ‘early win’ project in Tanzania led by by International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA).

The objective of the project is to quantify mycotoxin contamination levels on maize and cassava in Tanzania, and provide an objective basis for commissioning interventions to dramatically improve the health and livelihoods, and increase income of rural households.

The specific objectives are to:

  • to quantify key mycotoxins among toxic microbial metabolites in maize and cassava in rural households and markets;
  • to sensitize stakeholders in Tanzania about occurrence of key mycotoxins, allowing targeted mycotoxin mitigation strategies;
  • to establish a prevalence database that can guide mycotoxin risk assessment and risk mapping activities in the country and hence strengthen standards and regulation mechanisms.

Download the project proposal / view all outputs of the project

More ‘early win’ projects


The Africa RISING program comprises three linked research-for-development projects, funded by the USAID Feed the Future Initiative, and aiming to sustainably intensify mixed farming systems in West Africa (Southern Mali and Northern Ghana), the Ethiopian Highlands and East and Southern Africa (Tanzania, Zambia and Malawi).

To produce some short-term outputs and to support the longer term objectives of the projects, in 2012 Africa RISING funded several small, short-term projects in each of the regions. More information.

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